Past Friends and Inner Critics

Talking about my manuscript with another person has always helped me improve the quality of my writing. I used to do that by meeting with a writer friend once a week.

We swapped chapters and critiqued each other's writing, told each other what worked and what didn't. Whenever we got tired, we chatted and just enjoyed each other's company. It was nice! At the end of each meeting, we parted ways looking forward to the day we'd be published, cheering each other on not only as fellow writers but also as close friends.

Now we always kept in mind the reality that we may not get published. Sadly, we forgot to consider the fact that we may not always be friends. It's all right. That's just how life works out sometimes. I've met other writers since—busy writers who don't have the luxury of time to critique, especially when they're in school or raising families. Hey, neither do I, which is why it's important for writers to have their own inner critic.

My inner critic and I have a lot of bonding to do before we're ready for beta readers though. Our story's just beginning. We're in the first stages of novel-writing, in the first thirty minutes of The Avengers where we have similar interests but absolutely no coordination. It's frustrating, but I believe the worst of this team's internal conflict is over. Now it's time for the fun to begin.

Much love,
Louisa

Early Spring Cleaning

As of yesterday, this blog was titled A Lifetime of Dreaming and had over fifty entries posted on it. Today, I decided to make all those entries private. Why? Because I wanted to give myself time to clear my head and feel less overwhelmed in life. Once I feel better I'm sure I'll post those old entries again. After all, they do date back to 2013.

Young Louisa's developing thoughts were important too.

With this new space, I'd like to develop my older voice. The young and old have been warring with each other for a long time in my head now. It's a war between the side of me that believes in dreaming and the one that knows and hates reality. Consequently, this has created a very choppy writing style, resulting in endless backtracking and unsatisfying revisions on my manuscript.

Voice development is crucial. If I learn to look at the young and old voices with less cynicism and more kindness, I might finally transition into the one I'm supposed to have—and finish my book. One thing I know I shouldn't change, however, is how I end each entry. I may not mean it, but everyone must "fake it till they make it" before they can become the person they want to be.

Much love,
Louisa

Past Friends and Inner Critics

Talking about my manuscript with another person has always helped me improve the quality of my writing. I used to do that by meeting with ...